Federal Election
Monday, October 21

FAQs on voting

Can I vote in the election?

To vote in the federal election, you must:

  • be a Canadian citizen
  • be at least 18 years old on election day
  • prove your identity and address

Check if you're registered to vote.

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Where do I vote?

You can vote at several places  in-person or by mail from wherever you are.

In person

  1. At any Elections Canada office across Canada (before October 15 at 6:00 p.m.)
  2. On select campuses —October 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9
  3. In your riding at your assigned advance polling station – October 11, 12, 13 and 14
  4. In your riding at your assigned polling station on election day – October  21

By mail

On the road or living abroad? Vote by mail anywhere, anytime. Make sure register and apply to vote by Tuesday, October 15, at 6:00 p.m. and return your marked ballot to us by election day.

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Can I vote before election day?

Yes, there are several ways to vote before election day.

1. At any Elections Canada office across Canada

We have over 500 offices open seven days a week leading up to the election. Vote at any one of them before October 15 at 6:00 p.m. Find the Elections Canada office nearest to you.

2. At advance polls

Vote at your assigned advance polling station in your riding on October 11, 12, 13 or 14. Check your voter information card when it arrives in the mail or online after October 2.

3. On campus

Vote at select campuses across the country from Saturday, October 5 to Wednesday. October 9. You don't need to be a student to vote on campus. Find the campus voting location nearest to you.

4. By mail

Apply by mail before Tuesday, October 15 at 6:00 p.m. to get your voting kit. Make sure we receive your marked ballot by election day, October 21.

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Why are advance polls on Thanksgiving weekend? Lots of people are away from home that weekend.

We are required by the Canada Elections Act to hold advance polls on the 10th, 9th, 8th and 7th days before election day. These days coincide with Thanksgiving weekend.

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I'm out of town for Thanksgiving weekend. What are my voting options?

If you can't vote at your assigned advance polling station during Thanksgiving weekend, you can still vote:

  1. at any Elections Canada office across Canada before Tuesday, October 15, 6:00 p.m.—open seven days a week
  2. on election day – Monday, October 21
  3. by mail – apply by October 15 at 6:00 p.m.

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I'm a student. Can I vote on campus ?

There will be Elections Canada offices on more than 115 campuses across Canada from October 5 to 9. Anyone can vote at an office on campus.

Please note: Students voting on campus will need to confirm their residence. Their place of residence or home address is where they ordinarily live, think of as home or have adopted as home. Once they have confirmed their place of residence, they must make sure they're registered at that address and bring ID with that address when they go to vote.

Find the campus nearest to you.

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If I cannot vote on campus, what are my options?

If you cannot vote on campus, you can choose another way to vote. There are other options.

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I'm a member of the Canadian Forces. How do I vote?

There are special procedures for Canadian Forces voting.

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I'm serving a prison sentence in Canada. Can I vote?

Yes. As long as you're a Canadian citizen and will be at least 18 years old on election day, you can vote in your correctional institution. A staff member in your institution will be available to help you register and vote using the special ballot process.

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Can I take a selfie with my ballot?

No. Taking a picture of a marked ballot–yours or anyone else's–is illegal because it violates the secrecy of the vote under the Canada Elections Act. It's also a violation of the Act to publish a photo of a marked ballot in any way, including on social media.

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I'm a Canadian living abroad. How do I vote?

You will need to vote by mail. Make sure to apply to vote by mail before October 15, 6:00 p.m. Eastern time, and to return your marked ballot to us by 6:00 p.m., Eastern time, on election day.

Find out how to vote by mail.

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I'm homeless. How do I vote?

Eligible electors who are homeless or have no fixed address are welcome to register and vote.

Everyone who votes must prove their identity and address. This page lists all the types of proof of identity and address accepted at the polls.

Here are some of the ways you can prove your identity and address at the polls:

  • To prove your identity (name), you can show a piece of ID with your name on it, like a fishing license, library card, social insurance card (SIN card), birth certificate or Veterans Affairs Canada Health Identification Card.
  • To prove your address, you can show an official letter called a "Letter of Confirmation of Residence." If you have gone to a shelter for food or lodging, you can ask the shelter administrator for this letter.
  • You can still vote if you declare your identity and address in writing and have someone who knows you and who is assigned to your polling station vouch for you.
    The voucher must be able to prove their identity and address. A person can vouch for only one person (except in long-term care institutions).

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I live in a long-term care facility. How can I vote?

Eligible electors who live in a long-term care facility may be able to vote at a mobile polling station in their residence.

Elections Canada offers mobile polling stations in most residences. If required, we transport the ballot box from room to room. Please contact your facility administrator to find out if mobile polling will be offered in your residence.

Everyone who votes must prove their identity and address. This page lists all the types of proof of identity and address accepted at mobile polls.

Here are some ways to prove your identity and address:

  • To prove your identity (name), you can show a piece of ID with your name on it, like a health card, social insurance card (SIN card), birth certificate or Veterans Affairs Canada Health Identification Card.
    • If you live in a long-term care facility, you can show photocopies of your proof of identity and address documents.
  • To prove your address, one option is to show a "Letter of Confirmation of Residence" This is an official letter from a long-term care facility that says "this person lives here." You can request this letter from the facility administrator. You can also use the yellow carbon copy of the “Application for Revision or Registration on the List of Electors” if one was completed by an election officer.
  • You can have someone who knows you vouch for your identity and address. The voucher must be able to prove their identity and address. The voucher may be an employee of your residence. The employee may vouch for more than one elector and must reside in the same electoral district or adjacent electoral district as the person being vouched for.

For more information, please contact Elections Canada at 1-800-463-6868.

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How does Elections Canada accommodate electors who cannot vote using traditional voting options?

Returning officers may also set up voting kiosks in locations where electors may not be able to vote using traditional voting options. This includes: electors working in isolated areas, such as mining and oil field camps or lighthouses; electors in acute care hospitals; or electors who observe cultural or religious practices that restrict them from voting on specific dates. For more information on this option, please contact your Elections Canada office.

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