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Voter Registration Mailing (January 25, 2021)

Voter Registration Mailing

On January 25, 2021, we mailed out voter registration letters to potential new electors. If you are at least 18 years old and a Canadian citizen, you can register to vote at any federal election.

Register online now

For more information, read the FAQs below or contact us.

FAQs about Voter Registration Letters


Why did I receive this voter registration letter?

You received this letter because you may be qualified to vote in federal elections but are not currently registered. The purpose of the letter is to invite you to register online if you are at least 18 years old and a Canadian citizen.

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What is the National Register of Electors?

The National Register of Electors (the Register) is a database of Canadian citizens who are at least 18 years old and qualified to vote in federal elections and referendums. It contains basic information about each elector—name, address, gender and date of birth.

The information in the Register is used to create lists of electors during federal elections, by-elections and referendums. It may also be shared with provincial, territorial, and some municipal electoral agencies that have signed agreements with Elections Canada, as permitted by the Canada Elections Act. Canadians may choose whether or not to have their names included in the Register or shared with electoral agencies.

Elections Canada takes precautions to make sure that the information in the Register is kept secure and used for authorized purposes only.

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What happens when I register?

We add your information to the National Register of Electors, the database of people qualified to vote in Canadian federal elections. During federal elections and referendums, we will send you a voter information card that tells you when and where to vote. If you register in advance, you will save time at the polls.

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Do I have to register again during future federal elections?

No. Once your name is in the National Register of Electors, you stay registered.

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Where did you get my information?

We receive information from the Canada Revenue Agency, if you consented on your income tax return to share your information with us. We also receive information on potential electors from most provincial and territorial driver's licence bureaus. We use this information to keep potential electors' records up to date and to invite them to register if eligible.

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I'm not a Canadian citizen. What should I do with the letter?

You must be a Canadian citizen to vote. Please disregard and dispose of the letter. If you become a Canadian citizen in the future, you can register to vote at that time.

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I just used the Online Voter Registration Service to register. Why am I getting this letter?

It is possible that you completed your transaction online after the letter was prepared. You can use the online service to check that you are registered or update the address information you provided.

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I am a student. Which address should I use to register to vote?

You should register to vote using the address you consider your place of residence or home address.

If you are a student, this can be:

  • where you live while at school OR
  • where you live while not at school (e.g. with your parents)

You must have ID with that address to register and vote.

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What's the difference between a mailing address and a residential address?

Your mailing address is the one you commonly use to receive mail and may include a post office box number, rural route or other specific mailing information. We need this address during elections to mail you information about when and where you should go to vote.

Your residential address is the one used to indicate your residence and usually consists of a building number, street name, municipality name, province and postal code. We need this information to determine the correct polling station to assign you to vote in a federal election.

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I ticked the box on my income tax form to consent to sharing my information with Elections Canada. Am I not already registered?

We need to confirm that you're qualified to vote (18 years old and a Canadian citizen) before adding your information to the National Register of Electors.

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When I do my taxes, should I always tick the box to consent to sharing my information with Elections Canada?

If you are Canadian citizen, yes. Once you are registered on the National Register of Electors, ticking this box every year helps keep your address information up to date.

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If I register to vote with Elections Canada, does that also register me to vote in provincial, territorial and municipal elections?

We have agreements to share voter registration information with provincial, territorial and some municipal electoral agencies. However, it's always best to check with your local electoral agency to make sure you are registered.

If you want, you can opt out of having Elections Canada share your voter registration information with other electoral agencies.

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How can I be sure that the voter registration letter I received is really from Elections Canada?

Elections Canada always sends voter registration letters to potential new electors by mail. We never ask you to share personal information or answer security questions via email or text message.

Before entering and sending any personal information online, make sure that the page is secure by looking for the security seal (closed padlock) and "https://" in the URL address field at the top of your browser. You will see these security features when using Elections Canada's Online Voter Registration Service.

The privacy of all information in the National Register of Electors is protected by the Canada Elections Act and the Privacy Act. Elections Canada takes precautions to make sure that the information in the Register is kept secure and used for authorized purposes only.

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Why am I being asked to provide my email address and/or phone number through the online service?

Providing this information is optional. We ask you to provide your email address and/or phone number so that we can follow up with you if more information is needed to process your request.

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I now live at an address that is different from the one printed on the letter. Which address should I use to register online?

When you access the Online Voter Registration Service, you should enter the address that is printed in the middle of the letter you received. On the Results page, you will be given the option to update your home and mailing address. Click on the link, Update your home address or mailing address here, and enter your new address.

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What if I can't register online?

Check that the information you entered is accurate and complete, or make any required corrections and submit it again. If you still can't register, call us at 1-800-463-6868 for assistance.

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I received a letter for a person who does not live here. What should I do with it?

If you have received someone else's mail, you can write "Moved" or "Unknown" on the envelope and put it in a mailbox. The envelope will then be returned to Elections Canada, and we will take the appropriate action.

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I received a letter for someone who passed away. Why? What should I do with the letter?

Normally, death notifications are sent to Elections Canada from provincial or territorial vital statistics agencies and are applied to the relevant record. Unfortunately, the information on this person had not yet been received at the time this mailing was prepared. Please disregard and dispose of the letter.

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What is a TTY service?

A TTY is a special device that lets people who are deaf, hard of hearing, or speech-impaired use the telephone to communicate by enabling them to type messages back and forth to one another instead of talking and listening. A TTY is needed at both ends of the conversation to communicate. Elections Canada's TTY service line is 1-800-361-8935.

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