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Voter Registration Letters

Voter Registration Mailing

We recently mailed out voter registration letters to potential eligible elect s. If you are 18 years of age or older and a Canadian citizen, you can register in order to be ready to vote during the federal election this fall.

Register online now

For more information, read the FAQs below or contact us.

FAQs about Voter Registration Letters


Why did I receive this voter registration letter?

You received this letter because you may be eligible to vote in federal elections but are not currently registered. The purpose of the letter is to invite you to register online if you are eligible.

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What is the National Register of Electors?

The National Register of Electors is a database of Canadian citizens who are at least 18 years old and eligible to vote in federal elections and referendums. It contains basic information about each elector: name, address, gender and date of birth.

The information in the National Register of Electors is used to create lists of electors during federal elections, by-elections and referendums. It may also be shared with provincial, territorial, and some municipal electoral agencies that have signed agreements with Elections Canada, as permitted by the Canada Elections Act. Canadians can choose whether or not to have their names included in the Register or shared with electoral agencies.

Elections Canada takes precautions to ensure that the information in the Register is kept secure and used for authorized purposes only.

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What happens when I register?

We add your information to the National Register of Electors, the database of people eligible to vote in Canadian federal elections. During federal elections and referendums, we will send you a voter information card that tells you when and where to vote. If you register in advance, you will save time at the polls.

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Do I have to register again during future federal elections?

Once your name is in the National Register of Electors, you stay registered. You do not have to register again during future federal elections.

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Where did you get my information?

We receive information from the Canada Revenue Agency if you consented on your income tax return to share your information with us. We also receive information on potential electors from provincial and territorial driver's license bureaus. We use this information to keep your registration information up to date.

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I'm not a Canadian citizen. What should I do with the letter?

You must be a Canadian citizen in order to vote. Ignore the contents and dispose of this letter. If you become a Canadian citizen in the future, you can register to vote at that time.

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I'm not 18. What should I do with the letter?

You must be aged 18 or older on election day in order to vote. If you are not yet 18, but will be on election day, you can register to vote.

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I just used the Online Voter Registration Service to register. Why am I getting this letter?

It’s possible that you completed your transaction online after this mailing was prepared. You can use the service to check or update the information you provided. If you don’t need to check or update your information, you do not need to do anything.

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How can I be sure that the information I entered online is secure and kept confidential?

Elections Canada will never ask you to share personal information or answer security questions via email or text message. Before entering and sending any personal information online, ensure that the page is secure. Make sure that there is a security seal (a closed padlock icon) and “https://” in the URL address field at the top of your browser.

The privacy of all information in the National Register of Electors is protected by the Canada Elections Act and the Privacy Act. Elections Canada takes precautions to ensure that the information in the Register is kept secure and used for authorized purposes only.

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I am a student. Where should I register to vote?

You should register to vote at the place you consider your place of residence or home address.

If you are a student, this can be:

  • where you live while at school, OR
  • where you live while not at school (e.g. with your parents)

You must have ID with that address to register and vote. For more information on student voting, visit our website.

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What's the difference between a mailing address and a residential address?

Your mailing address is where you receive your mail. It can be the same as your residential address or include a P.O. box number, rural route or other specific mailing information. We need this address to mail you information, such as the voter information card we send out during elections.

Your residential address is where you reside, and it usually consists of a street number, street name, municipality name, province and postal code. We need this information to determine the riding in which you'll vote during an election.

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I thought I was already registered because I ticked the box on my income tax form to consent to sharing information with Elections Canada. Why are you sending me this?

We want to confirm that you're eligible to vote before adding your information to the National Register of Electors.

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When I do my taxes, should I keep ticking the box to consent to sharing my information with Elections Canada?

Yes, tick this box every year. Once you have registered online, we will add your name to the National Register of Electors. By providing your consent on your income tax return each year, we will continue to receive your current name and address, and we can update our files as required.

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If I register to vote with Elections Canada, does that also register me to vote in provincial, territorial and municipal elections?

We have agreements to share voter registration information with some provincial, territorial and municipal electoral agencies. However, there may be a delay before your information reaches other electoral agencies.

If you want, you can opt out of having Elections Canada share your voter registration information with other electoral agencies.

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How can I be sure that the voter registration letter I received is really from Elections Canada?

Elections Canada always sends voter registration letters to potential eligible electors by mail. We never ask you to share personal information or answer security questions via email or text message.

Double check the web address to make sure that it matches exactly the information in the letter you received from Elections Canada. Also, before entering and sending any personal information online, ensure that the page is secure. Make sure that there is a security seal (a closed padlock icon) and "https://" in the URL address field at the top of your browser.

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Why am I being asked to provide my email address and/or phone number?

This section is optional. We ask you to provide your email address and/or phone number so that we can follow up with you if more information is needed to process your request.

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I now live at an address that is different from the one printed on the letter. Which address should I use to register online?

When you access the Online Voter Registration Service, use the information that Elections Canada already has on file for you. That information is located in the middle of the letter you received.

Once we have confirmed that you are on the list of electors, you will be given the option to update your address information.

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What if I can't register online?

Check that the information you entered is accurate and complete, or make any required corrections and submit it again. If you still can't register, call us at 1-800-463-6868.

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I received a letter for someone who passed away. Why? What should I do with the letter?

Normally, death notifications are sent to Elections Canada from provincial or territorial vital statistics agencies. Unfortunately, the information on the person had not yet been received at the time of this mailing. Please ignore the contents and dispose of the letter.

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