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Voter Registration Verification Mailings

Voter Registration Mailing

Most Canadians who are eligible to vote (Canadian citizens at least 18 years old) are already registered in the National Register of Electors, which is used to create the lists of electors for federal elections, by-elections and referendums.

To make sure the Register is accurate, Elections Canada recently mailed out voter registration verification letters asking electors to check or update their address information.

Check or update your address information

For more information, read the FAQs below or contact us.

FAQs about the Voter Registration Qualification Mailing

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Q1: What is the purpose of the verification letter?

This letter asks electors to check or update their address information in the National Register of Electors.

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Q2: What is the National Register of Electors?

The National Register of Electors (the Register) is a database of Canadian citizens who are at least 18 years old and eligible to vote in federal elections and referendums. It contains basic information about each elector – name, address, gender and date of birth.

The information in the Register is used to create lists of electors during federal elections, by-elections and referendums. It may also be shared with provincial, territorial, and some municipal electoral agencies that have signed agreements with Elections Canada, as permitted by the Canada Elections Act. Canadians may choose whether or not to have their names included in the Register or shared with electoral agencies.

Elections Canada takes precautions to ensure that the information in the Register is kept secure and used for authorized purposes only.

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Q3: Where did you get my information?

We receive information from a variety of sources, including the Canada Revenue Agency (if you consented on your income tax return to share your information with us by checking the Elections Canada boxes); Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (new citizens who consented); provincial/territorial driver's licence bureaus; electoral agencies; and when you register to vote or update your registration.

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Q4: Is my information in the National Register of Electors kept confidential?

Yes. The privacy of all information in the National Register of Electors (the Register) is protected by the Canada Elections Act and the Privacy Act. Elections Canada takes precautions to ensure that the information in the Register is kept secure and used for authorized purposes only.

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Q5: How do I check or update my address information?

You can check or update your address information by using Elections Canada's Online Voter Registration Service. If you have difficulties with or no access to the online service, or need to update other information, such as your name, submit a Contact us form or call us at 1-800-463-6868. The TTY service line is 1-800-361-8935, for people who are deaf or hard of hearing.

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Q6: How can I be sure that my personal information entered online is secure?

We ask that you double-check the web address to ensure that it matches exactly what is indicated in the letter that you received from Elections Canada. Also, before entering and sending any personal information online, ensure that the page is secure by looking for the security seal (closed padlock) and "https://" in the URL address field at the top of your browser. You will see these when using Elections Canada's Online Voter Registration Service to check or update your address information.

Elections Canada always sends voter registration verification letters by mail. We will never ask you to share personal information or answer security questions via email or text message.

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Q7: What happens if I do not go online and check my information within 60 days of receiving the letter?

By law, the Chief Electoral Officer is authorized to and will remove from the National Register of Electors the name of any person who fails to check or update their address information within 60 days of receiving the letter.

Once your name is removed from the Register, you will need to register during the next federal election or referendum in order to vote.

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Q8: I missed the deadline. What do I do?

You can use our Online Voter Registration Service to register again. If you have difficulties with or no access to this service, submit a Contact us form or call us at 1-800-463-6868. The TTY service line is 1-800-361-8935, for people who are deaf or hard of hearing. If needed, we can send you an Update Request form to complete, sign and return to Elections Canada, with photocopies of the required identification. A return envelope will be provided for your convenience.

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Q9: What if I can't use the Online Voter Registration Service?

If you have difficulty using the online service, or need to update other information such as your name, submit a Contact us form or call us at 1-800-463-6868. The TTY service line is 1-800-361-8935, for people who are deaf or hard of hearing. We can send you an Update Request form to complete, sign and return to Elections Canada, with photocopies of the required identification. A return envelope will be provided for your convenience.

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Q10: I recently used the Online Voter Registration Service to check or update my address information; why am I getting this letter?

It is possible that you completed your transaction online after the letter was prepared. If you want to check the information currently on your voter registration file, please use the online service; if not, no further action is required from you.

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Q11: I'm not a Canadian citizen. Why did I receive this letter and what should I do with it?

You received a verification letter because your information in the National Register of Electors needs to be validated. If you are not a Canadian citizen, contact us and we will ensure that your information is removed from the Register, as only Canadian citizens can be registered to vote. If you become a Canadian citizen in the future, you will be able to register to vote at that time.

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Q12: I now live at a different address than the one printed on the letter. Which address should I use?

If your address is different than the one printed on the letter, you need to update your address. On the Voter Registration – Home Address page of the Online Voter Registration Service, you should enter the address that is printed on the letter you received from us. On the Voter Registration – Results page you will be given the option to update your home and mailing address. Click on the link Update your home address or mailing address here and enter your new address.

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Q13: Is a mailing address different from a residential address?

Although the mailing address and the residential address can often be the same, it may be different.

Your mailing address is the one you commonly use to receive mail and may include a post office box number, rural route or other specific mailing information. We need this address to mail you information during elections regarding when and where you should go to vote.

Your residential address is the one used to indicate your residence, and usually consists of a building number, street name, municipality name, province and postal code. Alternatively, you may use a legal land description, such as section, township, range and meridian, or a lot/concession-type address, to describe where your residence is located. We need this information to determine the correct polling station to assign you to for an election.

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Q14: I have legally changed my name and my new name does not appear on the letter. What should I do?

To change your name, contact us. We can send you an Update Request form to complete, sign and return to Elections Canada, with photocopies of the required identification. A return envelope will be provided for your convenience.

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Q15: Why did I receive a verification letter from Elections Canada but my ____ did not?

You received a verification letter because your information in the National Register of Electors needs to be validated.

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Q16: I received a letter for a person who does not live here. What should I do with the envelope?

If you have received someone else's mail, you can write 'Moved' or 'Unknown' on the envelope and deposit it in a mailbox. The envelope will then be returned to Elections Canada and the appropriate action will be taken.

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Q17: I received a letter for someone who is deceased. Why? What should I do with the letter?

If you received a letter for a person who has passed away, you don't need to do anything. Elections Canada has agreements with the Registrars of Vital Statistics in each province and territory to regularly receive files that include the names of people over the age of 18 whose deaths have been registered. Once received, this information is matched against the Register and the names of electors who are confirmed to be deceased are removed from the Register.

In rare cases, deceased electors may still appear on the Register. This can happen due to time lags in processing the data received from vital statistics registrars; differences in name, address and date of birth that prevent Elections Canada from matching the person with the corresponding death record received; or the person has died outside Canada. 

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Q18: Why am I being asked to provide my email address and/or phone number through the online service?

Providing this information is optional. We ask you to provide your email address and/or phone number so that we can follow up with you if more information is required to process your request.

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Q19: What is a TTY service?

A TTY is a special device that lets people who are deaf, hard of hearing, or speech-impaired use the telephone to communicate, by allowing them to type messages back and forth to one another instead of talking and listening. A TTY is required at both ends of the conversation in order to communicate. Elections Canada TTY service line is 1-800-361-8935.

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