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Survey of Electors Following the October 23, 2017, By-election in Lac-Saint-Jean (Quebec) and Sturgeon River–Parkland (Alberta)

Detailed Findings

I. Awareness of the By-election and Voter Information

Most were aware of the October 23, 2017, by-election

The vast majority of surveyed electors (93%) said they were aware of the October 23, 2017, by-election that was held in their federal riding.

Figure 1: Awareness of By-election

Aware of by-election 93%, Not aware 7%.

Q1: Did you know that a federal by-election took place on October 23, 2017, in your riding? Base: n=800; all respondents [Dk/nr: <0.5%]

There were no significant differences between the respondents from Sturgeon River–Parkland riding and those from Lac-Saint-Jean riding.

In addition, this is noteworthy:

  • University graduates were more aware (98%) of the by-election than were those with a college-level education (91%) or high school education or less (92%).

Moderate recall of Elections Canada advertising

Approximately two thirds (67%) of respondents who were aware of the by-election recalled seeing, hearing or reading advertisements from EC about how, when and where to vote in the October 23, 2017, by-election.

Figure 2: Recall of Elections Canada Advertisements

Did not recall ads 30%, Recalled ads 67%.

Q29. During the election period, did you see, hear or read any advertising or communications from Elections Canada about how, when and where to vote in the by-election on October 23? Base: n=757; those aware of the by-election [Dk/nr: 3%]

Recall of EC advertisements was higher among respondents from Lac-Saint-Jean riding (72%) than those in Sturgeon River–Parkland riding (61%).

In addition, the likelihood of recalling advertisements was higher among:

  • those who voted (74%) than those who did not (57%)
  • those who received their VIC (72%) than those who did not (33%)
  • respondents aged 55 and older (71%) than respondents aged 34 to 55 (60%)
  • those who voted in the 2015 federal general election (71%) than those who did not (53%)

Traditional media were top sources for recalled advertisements

Those who recalled seeing, hearing or reading advertising or communications from EC for the October 23 by-election were most likely to have noticed it in a newspaper (36%), on television (30%), or on the radio (21%).

Figure 3: Source of Recall of Elections Canada Advertising

Figure 3: Source of Recall of Elections Canada Advertising
Text version of "Figure 3: Source of Recall of Elections Canada Advertising"

Q29a: Where did you see, hear or read about it? (multiple responses accepted) Base: n=502; respondents who recalled communications from EC [Dk/nr: 1%]

Notable subgroup differences include the following:

  • Mentions of newspaper increased with age (from 9% for respondents aged 18 to 24 to 44% for respondents over the age of 55).
  • The likelihood of mentioning television was higher among residents of Lac-Saint-Jean riding (42%) than among residents of Sturgeon River–Parkland riding (30%); the same applies to radio (15% versus 10%).

Electors feel informed about how, when and where to vote

The majority of electors who were aware of the by-election (85%) said they were informed, with 63% saying they were very informed.

Figure 4: Knowledge of How, When and Where to Vote

Figure 4: Knowledge of How, When and Where to Vote
Text version of "Figure 4: Knowledge of How, When and Where to Vote"

Q28. Overall, how well informed do you feel you were about how, when and where to vote? Base: n=757; those aware of the by-election [Dk/nr: 1%]

Residents in Lac-Saint-Jean riding were more likely to feel informed than residents of Sturgeon River–Parkland riding (90% versus 81%).

In addition, the likelihood of feeling informed was higher among:

  • respondents who voted in the by-election (96%) than those who did not (71%)
  • those who received a VIC (94%) than those who did not (33%)
  • respondents who voted in the 2015 federal election (91%) than those who did not (63%)
  • those who are over the age of 55 (90%) than those 18 to 24 years of age (65%)

Few used EC's website; those who did were satisfied with the information

Fewer than 1 in 10 electors aware of the by-election visited EC's website during the campaign. The likelihood of visiting the website was higher among electors from Sturgeon River–Parkland riding (11%, versus 4% of electors in Lac-Saint-Jean riding) and among women (10%, versus 4% of men).

Figure 5: Elections Canada Website: Visitors and Satisfaction

Figure 5: Elections Canada Website: Visitors and Satisfaction
Text version of "Figure 5: Elections Canada Website: Visitors and Satisfaction"

Q30 [left]. Did you visit Elections Canada's website during the campaign? Base: n=757; those aware of the by-election [Dk/nr: <2%]
Q31 [right]. Overall, how satisfied were you with the information on Elections Canada's website? Would you say ...? Base: n=47; all who visited the site

Of the 47 respondents who visited EC's website during the campaign, 95% said they were satisfied with the information provided on the website, with 61% saying they were very satisfied.

Few contacted EC; those who did were satisfied with the information

Only 2% of surveyed electors who were aware of the by-election said they had contacted EC during the campaign. Most of these respondents (n=20)footnote 1 said they were satisfied with the information they received from EC: 75% were very satisfied, and 13% were somewhat satisfied.

Figure 6: Contact with Elections Canada: Contact and Satisfaction

Figure 6: Contact with Elections Canada: Contact and Satisfaction
Text version of "Figure 6: Contact with Elections Canada: Contact and Satisfaction"

Q32 [left]. Did you contact Elections Canada during the campaign? Base: n=757; those aware of the by-election
Q33 [right]. Overall, how satisfied were you with the information provided when you contacted Elections Canada? Would you say ...? Base: n=20; respondents who contacted EC

There were no significant differences between respondents from Sturgeon River–Parkland riding and those from Lac-Saint-Jean riding.

II. Voter Information Card and Registration

Most received their voter information card

Most of those who were aware of the by-election (83%) said that they received their VIC.

Figure 7: Receipt of Voter Information Card

Figure 7: Receipt of Voter Information Card
Text version of "Figure 7: Receipt of Voter Information Card"

Q4. During the campaign, did you receive a voter information card addressed to you personally and telling you where and when to vote? Base: n=757; those who said they were aware of the by-election [Dk/nr: 3%]footnote 2

There were no significant differences between respondents from Sturgeon River–Parkland riding and those from Lac-Saint-Jean riding.

That being said, respondents were more likely to report receiving a VIC if they had voted in the:

  • 2017 by-election (95%, versus 68% of those who did not vote in the by-election)
  • 2015 federal general election (91%, versus 57% of those who did not vote in that general election)

Virtually everyone said VIC showed the correct information

Nearly everyone who said they received a VIC said it showed the correct name (98%) and address (96%).

Figure 8: Voter Information Card – Accuracy of Name and Address

Figure 8: Voter Information Card – Accuracy of Name and Address
Text version of "Figure 8: Voter Information Card – Accuracy of Name and Address"

Q5 [left]. Was your name correct on the card you received? Base: n=633; respondents who received their voter information card [Dk/nr: 1%]
Q6 [right]. Was your address correct on the card? Base: n=633; respondents who received their voter information card [Dk/nr: 1%]

There were no significant differences between respondents from Sturgeon River–Parkland riding and those from Lac-Saint-Jean riding regarding receiving a VIC that showed the correct name and address.

Majority of respondents brought their VIC to the polling station

Over three quarters (78%) of those who voted brought their VIC when they went to vote.

Figure 9: Voter Information Card – Brought to Vote

Figure 9: Voter Information Card – Brought to Vote
Text version of "Figure 9: Voter Information Card – Brought to Vote"

Q21. Did you bring your voter information card with you to the polling station/advance polling station/local Elections Canada office? Base: n=440; respondents who voted [Dk/nr: 1%]

There were no significant differences between the respondents from Sturgeon River–Parkland riding and those from Lac-Saint-Jean riding.

Most respondents knew voters need to be registered

More than four in five respondents (84%) knew that voters need to be registered in order to vote in a Canadian federal election.

Figure 10: Awareness of Registration to Vote

Figure 10: Awareness of Registration to Vote
Text version of "Figure 10: Awareness of Registration to Vote"

Q7. Do voters need to be registered in order to vote in a Canadian federal election? Base: n=800; all respondents [Dk/nr: 3%]

Knowledge of voter registration was higher among:

  • residents in Lac-Saint-Jean riding (93%) than residents in Sturgeon River–Parkland riding (76%)
  • those age 55 and older (91%) than among 35-to-54-year-olds (80%)

Nearly two thirds of those who said they didn't receive a VIC did nothing about it

Nearly two thirds of respondents (64%) who did not receive a VIC during the campaign did nothing to find out whether they were registered to vote in the federal by-election. Those who did something to find out if they were registered tend to have learned about the fact that they weren't registered from a revising agent who visited their home (13%) or from the polling station or local EC office (7%).

Figure 11: Steps Taken to Find Out if Registered to Vote

Figure 11: Steps Taken to Find Out if Registered to Vote
Text version of "Figure 11: Steps Taken to Find Out if Registered to Vote"

Q7A: What did you do to find out whether you were registered to vote in this by-election? Base: n=88; respondents who did not receive a VIC [Dk/nr: 4%]

Majority aware of online voter registration

Awareness of online registration was tested using a split sample. Half the respondents (n=345) were asked if electors could use an "Online Voter Registration Service" on the website, a question previously used in post-electoral phone surveys. Because this question had always yielded a high proportion of "don't know" answers, a simplified formulation was developed and posed to the other half of the sample (see full questions under the graph, below).

While a majority of respondents were aware of the registration service in both groups (51% and 70%, respectively), the second formulation led to a higher proportion of respondents who said yes and a lower proportion of respondents who either said no or who did not know.

Figure 12: Awareness of Online Voter Registration

Figure 12: Awareness of Online Voter Registration
Text version of "Figure 12: Awareness of Online Voter Registration"

Split sample:
Q8A. To the best of your knowledge, could electors use an Online Voter Registration Service on Elections Canada's website to check, update or complete their voter registration during the last by-election? Base: n=345 respondents who know voters need to be registered.
Q8B. To the best of your knowledge, is it possible for Canadian electors to check, update or complete their voter registration on Elections Canada's website? Base: n=344 respondents who know voters need to be registered.

The results of this split sample seem to indicate that the second formulation might be easier to understand. It will be reconducted in the next by-elections to confirm this finding.

III. Voting and Voter Participation

Over half reported voting in the by-election

Fifty-seven percent of respondents who were aware of the by-election reported voting in the election.

Figure 13: Voter Participation in October 23, 2017, By-election

Figure 13: Voter Participation in October 23, 2017, By-election
Text version of "Figure 13: Voter Participation in October 23, 2017, By-election"

Q2. Which of the following statements describes you? Base: n=757; those who said they were aware of the by-election [Dk/nr: <0.5%]

The likelihood of voting increased with age, from 23% of electors under 25 years of age to 64% of those age 55 and older.

Additionally, it was higher among respondents who:

  • received a VIC (65%, versus 14% of those who did not)
  • voted in the 2015 federal general election (68%, versus 14% of those who did not vote)

There were no significant differences between the respondents from Sturgeon River–Parkland riding and those from Lac-Saint-Jean riding.

Everyday life and health are main reasons for not voting in the election

Of the 309 respondents who said they did not vote during the election, the largest group (46%) said they did not vote due to everyday life and health reasons. Following this, respondents also reported that they did not vote due to political reasons (27%) or reasons related to the electoral process (10%).

Figure 14: Main Reasons for Not Voting – Themes

Figure 14: Main Reasons for Not Voting – Themes
Text version of "Figure 14: Main Reasons for Not Voting – Themes"

Q3: What is the main reason you did not vote? Base: n=309; respondents who did not vote [Dk/nr: 3%]

The table below breaks down the reasons why respondents did not vote during the October 23, 2017, federal by-election.

Figure 15: Main Reasons for Not Voting–Breakdown
Reasons for Not Voting %
Everyday life or health reasons 46
Too busy 28
Out of town 12
Illness or disability 6
Reasons for Not Voting %
Political reasons 27
Not interested in politics 9
Lack of information about campaign issues and parties' positions 5
Did not like candidates/parties/campaign 5
Did not know who to vote for 4
Felt voting would not make a difference 3
Reasons for Not Voting %
Electoral process-related reasons 10
Lack of information about voting process (such as when/where to vote) 6
Transportation problem/polling station too far 3
Not on voters list 1
Issues with the voter information card Less than 0.5
Could not prove identity or address Less than 0.5
Reasons for Not Voting %
Other reasons 12
Forgot to vote 8
Religious or other beliefs Less than 0.5
Other 3

As the chart below shows, respondents who were out of town were most likely to be away from their home for a period of seven days or lessfootnote 3.

Figure 16: Non-Voters Length of Time Away from Home

Figure 16: Non-Voters Length of Time Away from Home
Text version of "Figure 16: Non-Voters Length of Time Away from Home"

Q3b: How long were you away from home? Base: n=46; respondents who were away from home during the election [Dk/nr: 23%]

Advance polling station is the most recognized alternative way to vote

Nearly all respondents (95%) said they were aware that Canadians can vote at advance polling stations. As well, two thirds said that it is possible to vote at the local EC office, and 28% said that Canadians can vote by mail.

Figure 17: Knowledge of Voting Methods

Figure 17: Knowledge of Voting Methods
Text version of "Figure 17: Knowledge of Voting Methods"

Q9A. At federal elections, is it possible for Canadian electors to vote ... at the advance polling station? Base: n=800
Q9B. At federal elections, is it possible for Canadian electors to vote ... at the local Elections Canada office? Base: n=800
Q9C. At federal elections, is it possible for Canadian electors to vote ... by mail? Base: n=800

Notable subgroup differences include the following:

  • Respondents who were aware they can vote at a local EC office were more likely to:
    • be residents of Lac-Saint-Jean riding (78%) than to be residents of Sturgeon River–Parkland riding (54%)
    • be over the age of 55 (75%) than to be 35 to 54 (62%)
    • have a high school-level education (75%) than to have some college (60%) or university education (61%).
  • Respondents who were aware they can vote by mail were more likely to:
    • be residents of Sturgeon River–Parkland riding (35%, versus 21% for Lac-Saint-Jean riding)
    • be between the ages of 18 and 24 (56%) than to be between 35 and 54 (21%) or 55 and older (25%)
    • have some college/university-level education (32%) than to be university graduates (21%)

Majority of electors opted to vote at polling station on election day

Over three quarters (77%) of respondents said they voted at a polling station on election day. However, one in five (19%) said they used advance polling stations. Only 3% said they voted at an EC office.

Figure 18: Methods Used to Vote

Figure 18: Methods Used to Vote
Text version of "Figure 18: Methods Used to Vote"

Q10A: Which method did you use to vote? Was it ... Base: n=444; all respondents who voted [Dk/nr: <0.5%]

There were no significant differences between the respondents from Sturgeon River–Parkland riding and those from Lac-Saint-Jean riding.

Various reasons offered for voting at an advance polling station or EC office

Of the respondents who voted at an advance poll or at the local EC office (n=99), the largest group said they did so because they knew they would be away from home on election day (32%). The next-largest group said it was convenient (29%).

Figure 19: Reasons to Vote at Advance Polling Station or Elections Canada Office

Figure 19: Reasons to Vote at Advance Polling Station or Elections Canada Office
Text version of "Figure 19: Reasons to Vote at Advance Polling Station or Elections Canada Office"

Q10B: Is there a specific reason as to why you used this option to vote? Base: n=99; respondents who voted at advance polling station or EC office [Dk/nr: <1%]

There were no significant differences between the respondents from Sturgeon River–Parkland riding and those from Lac-Saint-Jean riding.

IV. Voter Identification

Widespread awareness of identification requirements

Awareness of identification requirements was tested using a split sample. Traditionally, post-electoral surveys asked respondents whether they needed a proof of identity, first, and a proof of address, second. This formulation led to very high proportions of "yes" for both answers, but pre-tests seemed to indicate that some respondents did not perceive a difference between the two.

A second version was thus developed, asking respondents whether, to the best of their knowledge, electors need proof of identity, proof of address, both, or none. The two formulations were compared using a split-sample experiment.

The first formulation found that nearly all (98%) respondents think that electors must present proof of identity in order to vote in a Canadian election. This is in line with the results of previous surveys. Slightly fewer, but still the vast majority (92%), said electors also must present proof of address.

The second half of the sample was asked the modified question. Only 69% correctly said that both proof of identity and address are required. Conversely, 28% answered incorrectly, indicating that electors could use only a proof of identity (26%), only a proof of address (1%), or neither (1%).

Figure 20: Awareness of Voter Identification Requirements

Figure 20: Awareness of Voter Identification Requirements
Text version of "Figure 20: Awareness of Voter Identification Requirements"

Q12B [left]. Do voters have to present a proof of IDENTITY in order to vote in a Canadian federal election? [SPLIT SAMPLE: n=400]. Dk/NR: 1%
Q13 [left]. Do voters have to present a proof of ADDRESS in order to vote in a Canadian federal election? [SPLIT SAMPLE:nbspn=400]. Dk/NR: 3%
Q12A [right]. In order to vote in a Canadian federal election, must electors provide ...? [SPLIT SAMPLE: n=400]. Dk/NR: 3%

The results of this split sample indicate that the new formulation leads to results that better reflect respondents' grasp of identification requirements. It will be reconducted in the next by-elections to confirm this finding.

Virtually everyone who voted had the required identification

Ninety-six percent of respondents who voted in the October 23, 2017, federal by-election had the required identification documents with them when they went to vote.

Figure 21: Identification Requirements

Figure 21: Identification Requirements
Text version of "Figure 21: Identification Requirements"

Q14. Did you have the required identification documents with you? Base: n=427; respondents who voted at an advance poll or at a polling station on election day

Notable subgroup differences include the following:

  • Lac-Saint-Jean riding residents were more likely to have the required identification than were residents of Sturgeon River–Parkland riding (100% versus 93%).
  • Respondents between the ages of 25 and 34 were less likely to have the required identification (83%, versus 99% of older respondents).

The vast majority who voted found it easy to meet the identification requirements

Those who voted at polling stations found it easy to meet the identification requirement–88% said it was very easy, and 8% somewhat easy.

Figure 22: Ease of Meeting Voter Identification Requirements

Figure 22: Ease of Meeting Voter Identification Requirements
Text version of "Figure 22: Ease of Meeting Voter Identification Requirements"

Q15. Overall, how easy was it to meet the identification requirements? Would you say that it was ...? Base: n=427; respondents who voted at an advance poll or at a polling station on election day

These respondents were more likely to find it somewhat or very easy to meet the identification requirements:

  • women (99%, versus 94% of men)
  • residents of Lac-Saint-Jean riding (99%, versus 94% of Sturgeon River–Parkland riding residents)

V. Voter Experience

Voting viewed as "somewhat" or "very" easy by most

Respondents who voted were asked how easy it was to vote. Just over three quarters of voters (78%) said it was very easy, while 16% said it was somewhat easy to vote.

Figure 23: Ease of Voting

Figure 23: Ease of Voting
Text version of "Figure 23: Ease of Voting"

Q11. Overall, how easy was it to vote? Would you say it was ...? Base: n=443; respondents who voted and identified a voting method

There were no significant differences between the respondents from Sturgeon River–Parkland riding and those from Lac-Saint-Jean riding.

Majority went from home to the polling location

Of those who voted in person for the October 23, 2017, by-election, the majority (81%) said they went from home to the polling location.

Figure 24: Voting Facilities – Starting Location

Figure 24: Voting Facilities – Starting Location
Text version of "Figure 24: Voting Facilities – Starting Location"

Q16. When you went to vote, did you go to the polling location from home, from work, or from another location? Base: n=440; respondents who voted at an advance poll, polling station on election day, or local Elections Canada office [Dk/nr: 1%]

Notable subgroup differences include the following:

  • Residents of Lac-Saint-Jean riding were more likely to go to the polling location from their home than were residents of Sturgeon River–Parkland riding (89% versus 72%).
  • The likelihood of going to the polling location from home increased with age; however, it increased significantly only when the 35-to-54-year-olds (75%) are compared with those 55 and over (91%).
  • Respondents with high school-level education (88%) were more likely to go to the polling location from home than were those with college-level education (73%).

Virtual unanimity that the polling centre was convenient and easy to reach

Nearly everyone who voted in the by-election thought that the voting location was a convenient distance from home (98%) and was not difficult to reach (97%).

Majority agree that facilities were suitable and had plenty of signage

Almost all voters (99%) said the building where they voted was suitable, with 86% saying it was very suitable. Furthermore, 98% said that there were enough signs inside the facility to help them find where they should go to vote.

Figure 25: Voting Facilities – Suitability

Figure 25: Voting Facilities – Suitability
Text version of "Figure 25: Voting Facilities – Suitability"

Q19. Would you say that the building where you voted was ...? Base: n=440; respondents who voted at an advance poll, polling station on election day, or local Elections Canada office [Dk/NR: <0.5%]

There were no significant differences between the respondents from Sturgeon River–Parkland riding and those from Lac-Saint-Jean riding.

Time of day electors voted

Of the respondents who voted on election day (n=341), 44% recalled that they voted in the evening, 25% in the morning, and 20% in the afternoonfootnote 4.

Figure 26: Time of Day Voted – Election Day

Figure 26: Time of Day Voted – Election Day
Text version of "Figure 26: Time of Day Voted – Election Day"

Q22. Do you remember approximately what time it was when you went to vote? Base: n=341; respondents who voted at a polling station on election day [Dk/nr: 11%]
*Election Day polls open from before 8:00 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. in ALBERTA and 9:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. in QUEBEC.

Among those who voted ahead of election day:

  • Four in ten (40%) of the 14 respondentsfootnote 5 who voted at their local EC officefootnote 6 did so in the afternoon (between noon and 4 p.m.).
  • Three quarters of the 85 respondents who reported voting at an advance pollfootnote 7 also did so during the afternoon (between noon and 4 p.m.).
Figure 27: Time of Day Voted – Advance Polling

Figure 27: Time of Day Voted – Advance Polling
Text version of "Figure 27: Time of Day Voted – Advance Polling"

Q22. Do you remember approximately what time it was when you went to vote? Base: n=85; respondents who voted at an advance poll [Dk/nr: 7%]
*Advance polling stations open at 12 p.m. and close at 8 p.m.

Voters took five minutes or less to vote

Sixty percent of all voters surveyed said it took them five minutes or less to vote.

Figure 28: Length of Time to Vote – All

Figure 28: Length of Time to Vote – All
Text version of "Figure 28: Length of Time to Vote – All"

Q23. How long did it take you to vote AT THE polling station on election day/advance polling station/local Elections Canada office? This does not include travel time.
Base: n=440; respondents who voted at an advance poll, polling station on election day, or local Elections Canada office [Dk/nr: 1%]

Of the respondents who voted on election day (n=341), nearly two thirds (63%) said it took five minutes or less to vote.

Figure 29: Length of Time to Vote – Election Day vs. Advance Polling Station

Figure 29: Length of Time to Vote – Election Day vs. Advance Polling Station
Text version of "Figure 29: Length of Time to Vote – Election Day vs. Advance Polling Station"

Q23. How long did it take you to vote AT THE polling station on election day? This does not include travel time. Base: n=341; respondents who voted at a polling station on election day [Dk/nr: 1%]
Q23. How long did it take you to vote AT THE advance polling station? This does not include travel time. Base: n=85; respondents who voted at an advance polling station [Dk/nr: 2%]

Among those who voted, but did not do so on election day:

  • Over half (57%) of the 14 respondentsfootnote 8 who voted at their local EC office said it took them five minutes or less.
  • Fifty-two percent of the 85 respondents who reported voting at an advance poll said it took them five minutes or less.

Widespread satisfaction with time required to vote

Nearly all voters (95%) felt that the time it took them to vote was reasonable.

Figure 30: Satisfaction with Time Taken to Vote

Figure 30: Satisfaction with Time Taken to Vote
Text version of "Figure 30: Satisfaction with Time Taken to Vote"

Q24. Would you say that this was a reasonable amount of time?
Base: n=440; respondents who voted at an advance poll, polling station on election day, or local Elections Canada office [Dk/nr: <0.5%]

Residents of Lac-Saint-Jean riding were more likely to be satisfied than residents of Sturgeon River–Parkland riding (98% versus 93%).

Nearly everyone was satisfied with Elections Canada staff

Ninety-six percent of respondents were satisfied with the EC staff, with 86% saying they were very satisfied.

Figure 31: Satisfaction with Elections Canada Staff

Figure 31: Satisfaction with Elections Canada Staff
Text version of "Figure 31: Satisfaction with Elections Canada Staff"

Q27. Overall, how satisfied were you with the services provided by Elections Canada staff when you voted? Would you say ...?
Base: n=440; respondents who voted at an advance poll, polling station on election day or local Elections Canada office

Residents of Lac-Saint-Jean riding were more likely to be very satisfied than were residents of Sturgeon River–Parkland riding (90% versus 82%).

All voters were satisfied with the official language in which they were served when voting.

Widespread satisfaction with voting experience

Ninety-five percent of respondents who voted reported they were satisfied with their overall voting experience during the October 23, 2017, federal by-election, with 74% saying they were very satisfied.

Figure 32: Satisfaction with Overall Voting Experience

Figure 32: Satisfaction with Overall Voting Experience
Text version of "Figure 32: Satisfaction with Overall Voting Experience"

Q34. Overall, how satisfied were you with your voting experience? Would you say ...?
Base: n=444; all respondents who voted

Notable subgroup differences include the following:

  • Residents of Lac-Saint-Jean riding were more likely to be satisfied than residents of Sturgeon River–Parkland riding (99% versus 92%).
  • Respondents with some college/university-level education (98%) and university graduates (98%) were more likely to be satisfied than those with high school-level education (89%).

VI. Fairness

Election widely judged to have been run fairly

Eighty-four percent of respondents who were aware of the by-election felt that it was run fairly.

Figure 33: Perceptions of Elections Canada’s Fairness

Figure 33: Perceptions of Elections Canada’s Fairness
Text version of "Figure 33: Perceptions of Elections Canada’s Fairness"

Q35. Thinking about the October 23, 2017, federal by-election, would you say that Elections Canada ran the election ...?
Base: n=757; those aware of the by-election

Residents of Lac-Saint-Jean riding and university graduates were more likely to say the election was run fairly. Specifically:

  • 89% of residents of Lac-Saint-Jean riding said the election was run fairly, compared with 79% of residents of Sturgeon River–Parkland riding.
  • 93% of university graduates said the election was run fairly, compared with 85% of college-educated respondents and 80% of those with high school or less.

Most have trust in the accuracy of the election results

Nearly 9 in 10 respondents (88%) trust the accuracy of the election results in their riding, with over half (54%) saying they have a very high level of trust.

Figure 34: Trust in Accuracy of Results

Figure 34: Trust in Accuracy of Results
Text version of "Figure 34: Trust in Accuracy of Results"

Q36. What level of trust do you have in the accuracy of the election results in your riding? Is it ...?
Base: n=757; those aware of the by-election [Dk/nr: 3%]

The likelihood of trusting the results increased with education, from 80% of those with a high school education to 95% of university graduates.

Main reason for low level of trust in election results

Of the 66 respondents who said they have a low level of trust in the accuracy of the election results, the reasons most frequently given were mistrust of government or politics (24%), followed by lack of awareness of the by-election (17%).

Figure 35: Explanations for Low Level of Trust in Election Results

Figure 35: Explanations for Low Level of Trust in Election Results
Text version of "Figure 35: Explanations for Low Level of Trust in Election Results"

Q37. Is there a specific reason as to why your level of trust is low when it comes to the accuracy of the election results in your riding?
Base: n=66; those with low trust in accuracy of results [Dk/nr: 16%]


Footnote 1 Exercise caution interpreting this finding due to the small sample size.

Footnote 2 This question was back-coded to include those who said they learned they were registered to vote from the VIC at Q7A.

Footnote 3 Exercise caution when interpreting this finding due to the small sample size and the relatively large proportion of respondents who did not know or chose not to respond.

Footnote 4 Voting on election day was available from 9:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. for the Lac-Saint-Jean (Quebec) by-election and from 8:00 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. for the Sturgeon River–Parkland (Alberta) by-election.

Footnote 5 No graph is provided due to the small sample size.

Footnote 6 The voting hours for the local Elections Canada office were 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on weekdays and 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on weekends.

Footnote 7 Voting hours for advance polls were between noon and 8 p.m.

Footnote 8 No graph is provided due to the small sample size.